Research and writing outside one’s preferred genre is much like learning to spin on the drop-spindle, I find. I find myself gliding through lists of books, thinking, “helpful, helpful, not so helpful, must get, must find, helpful…” and then I hit a block. Somethat whole research thing. Thanks to those of you who have taken the poll– (if you haven’t clicked–click! Please! [post below])

What I’ve found, from the results is that

  1. People who come here probably like yarn. Me too!
  2. People who come here are probably a bit obsessed with yarn and fiber. Me too!
  3. 25% of those who took my poll are more experienced spinners.
  4. 75% of those who took the poll are spinning–but only beginning.

Swing the vote! It’s super helpful in my research–which is slowing because of several things (another handy list):

  1. Good news: Spinning in America (the history, tradition and revival thereof) seems a fairly untouched topic.
  2. Bad News: Spinning in America (the history, tradition and revival thereof) seems a fairly untouched topic.
  3. Articles I’ve found in academic spheres and research databases tend to be concerned with broader topics: Industrial Revolution, factory life, colonial struggles.
  4. Articles/Books like to talk about everywhere but here and now: Macedonia, Ancient Greece, Europe…South America. Nothing much about the lovely U.S.–past OR present.

So what does this mean for my research? Well, like said, that’s good news: looks like I have free-range of the field and won’t infringe on some other writer/spinner’s brainchild. Bad news? looks like I have free-range of the field, which means a lot of digging–a lot of work. I’m a young writer, and I typically write fiction and poetry. If I delve into creative non-fiction it tends to be in the form of personal essay… Seems like I’m about to run a marathon when I’m accustomed to short jogs around the block.

img_59051 (click to see the mag’s website).

I’m finding Spin*Off to be a great resource for book reviews

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